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Catholic High School

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Curriculum

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A College Preparatory Curriculum

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Catholic High School’s academic program combines high expectations, rigor, and student engagement in a values-based Catholic environment where students learn, grow, and thrive. 

Our curriculum is designed to focus on content while developing moral citizens and empowered learners who apply critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and problem-solving skills in the classroom. Dedicated faculty utilize a variety of instructional methods, including purposeful use of digital technologies to provide opportunities to construct knowledge and to create new material. 

Advanced coursework in Honors level courses and 20 different AP classes across academic disciplines are available to students. Varied course offerings give students options to explore and cultivate their areas of interest. Students graduate from CHS fully prepared for the rigors of a collegiate environment. 

Honors and AP Courses

English: Honors English 2, AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and Composition 

History & Social Sciences: AP World History: Modern, AP United States History, AP United States Government & Politics, AP Comparative Government & Politics

Mathematics: Honors Algebra 2, College Algebra, Statistics, Pre-Calculus w/ Trigonometry, AP Calculus (AB), 

AP Calculus (BC), Multivariate Calculus, Linear Algebra, AP Computer Science A (offered in alternating years) 

Science: Honors Biology, Honors Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2 

World Languages: German 3, Latin 3, Spanish 3, Spanish 4, AP German Language and Culture, AP Latin, AP Spanish Language and Culture

Fine Arts & Technology: AP 2-D Art and Design, AP 3-D Art and Design, AP Drawing, AP Computer Science Principles (offered in alternating years)

Departments

Theology

Courses

All students are required to earn one credit of theology for each year they attend Catholic High School. No student is permitted to take more than one theology course at a time without permission from the department chairperson and the school administration. Students who fail courses may have to make them up in special classes held outside regular school time. (Course descriptions taken from Doctrinal Elements of a Curriculum Framework for the Development of Catechetical Materials for Young People of High School Age. Copyright @ 2008, United)


Theology 1

1 Credit
Grade 9

This year-long course is separated into two major sections.

Semester 1: Jesus Christ: God's Revelation to the World “provides a map for high school students to navigate the salvific work of God—Father, Son, and Spirit—in forming a People, giving a Law, and preparing for the Messiah. The one-semester course gives students a general knowledge and appreciation of Sacred Scripture through which they encounter Jesus Christ.

Semester 2: Jesus Christ: His Mission and Ministry “deepens the study of Jesus, highlighting key events in his earthly ministry while unpacking his teachings about God the Father, the Trinity, Mary, and the Holy Spirit. Students learn that the goal of discipleship is a life of grace and holiness and a share of God's everlasting Kingdom. The one-semester course encourages a course of action and calls on teens to "pick up their cross" and follow the Lord in this life and beyond by introducing key vocabulary terms, exploring relevant questions of faith, profiling famous Christian disciples, and offering several applications to put the lessons into action.


Theology 2

1 Credit
Grade 10

This year-long course is separated into two major sections.

Semester 1: Jesus Christ: Source of Our Salvation is a semester length course where students study the life and ministry of Jesus with a particular emphasis on the Paschal Mystery. In this course, students will examine human nature at its origins, wounded by sin, and saved through the intervention of God. Students will study an overview of Salvation History. From the beginning, God initiated His plan of salvation. God built His family through the successive covenants of the Old Testament, saved the world from sin through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ, and continues this salvific work through the sacraments of the Church. At the end of the course, students will consider related topics, including the following: life after death, the resurrection of the body, virtue, discipleship, and prayer.

Semester 2: Our Life in Christ: Foundations of Catholic Morality is a semester length course where students study Catholic Moral Teaching. In this course, students will examine truth, human dignity, love of God, and love of neighbor. God has established sure moral norms according to both natural law and Divine Revelation. The course is designed to mirror Part III of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which includes an introduction to moral theology, an explanation of the Ten Commandments, and an introduction to St. John Paul II’s Theology of the Body. Students will study the moral issues of today in light of the teachings of Jesus.


Theology 3

1 Credit
Grade 11

This year-long course is separated into two major sections.

Semester 1: The Church Our Story: Catholic Tradition, Mission, and Practice provides students with a means for understanding some of the traditional definitions of the Catholic Church. While acknowledging the importance of the historical perspective, this course emphasizes the living Church that makes Christ present to the world today.

Semester 2: Meeting Jesus in the Sacraments: This course reveals the sacraments as the definitive way that Jesus remains present to the Church and the world today. The course explores concrete ways for students to understand the sacraments, participate in their rites, and benefit from their graces.


Theology 4

1 Credit
Grade 12

Apologetics:  In this year-long class, students will be challenged to critically examine the foundational teachings of the Catholic Church, especially relating to God’s existence, faith and reason, moral relativism, prayer, vocations, false spiritualities/ cults, evil, and eternal life. Students will discover what they believe, the Magisterial and Scriptural teachings that support those beliefs, and discern God’s particular call to discipleship through a lived faith.  As a “capstone” course, the culmination of their theological studies at Catholic High School, students will perform extensive research on a particular topic, writing and presenting a major paper defending the doctrines of the Church in a secular world.

Faculty

Annie Gallagher

Annie Gallagher

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Annie earned her BA in Education from University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. She is the Department Chair for Theology and is a Freshman Class Moderator and Honor Council Moderator. Annie began teaching at CHS in 2007.

Steve DeLaney

Steve DeLaney

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Steve graduated from George Mason University with a B.A. in History, and has an M.A. in Theology from Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. He is married with two sons, and loves to write, hike, and work outdoors.

Adam Kelkis

Adam Kelkis

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Mr. Kelkis earned his BA in Philosophy from John Carroll University in Cleveland, OH and his MA in Theology from Holy Apostles College and Seminary in Cromwell, CT. Before arriving at Catholic High School, Mr. Kelkis taught Sacred Scripture and Catholic Moral Teaching at Delone Catholic High School in McSherrystown, PA. Mr. Kelkis joined the CHS faculty in 2017.

Emily Mislan

Emily Mislan

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Emily earned her B.A. in Theology and Catechetics from Franciscan University of Steubenville. She taught for two years in Toledo, Ohio, before joining the BSCHS faculty in 2016.

English

All students are required to earn one credit of English for each year they attend Catholic High School.

English courses aim to improve and enrich our students’ literacy skills in listening, speaking, reading, researching, and writing. Our curriculum is literature based and organized according to the four archetypal stories of romance, tragedy, irony/satire, and comedy. Selections of stories, poems, plays, films, and novels from English 1 through English 4 are taught in the context of this circle of archetypal stories. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied at each stage of the student’s development. 

Honors/AP Courses: Students will be selected based on grades consistently above average ("B" or higher) and their previous English teacher’s recommendation. Students applying for Honors English 2 will sit for an entrance test. Students with a "B+" average and their teacher's recommendation in Honors English 2 will be placed in AP Language and Composition their junior year. Additionally, those students with a "B" average and their current teacher's recommendation in AP Language and Composition will be placed in AP Literature and Composition their senior year.

Catholic High School does not accept summer school credit in lieu of regular course credit unless a student has failed a semester or more of English at CHS and needs the summer school English credit to advance to the next academic year.

Courses

English 1

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grade 9

English 1 lays a firm foundation in basic English skills for each student. These include skills in listening, speaking, reading, researching, and writing. The course content includes the systematic study of grammar, readings from the novel, short story, drama, and poetry. As part of their reading, students study Shakespearean tragedy with Romeo and Juliet, an epic, The Odyssey, a unit on classical Greek mythology, and various novels including Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm. Writing is a strong component of the class. Student writing is developed through practice with sentence combining, grammar study, paragraph construction, and essays. A workbook, Image Grammar, complements the curriculum introducing students to a variety of stylistic techniques to improve writing. Students will learn MLA format and will write a research report using reputable sources. They will learn how to find information, to narrow a topic, to craft a thesis, to gather information to support the thesis, and to organize and complete a successful paper. Student literacy is developed through vocabulary study, reading, and writing about a variety of genres. Students are introduced to the four basic stories of literature: romance, tragedy, irony/satire, and comedy. Writing assignments, frequent quizzes, tests, and a final exam at the end of each semester are required.


English 2

Prerequisite: English 1.
1 Credit
Grade 10

This course introduces sophomores who are reading at or above their grade level to a systematic study of the archetypal structures of myth, literature, and the formal elements of fiction and poetry. Students will continue to study the four basic stories of literature: romance, tragedy, irony/satire, and comedy, focusing especially on romance (The hero’s quest story). Shakespearean comedy is introduced with A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Students will read the modern play The Crucible and various novels such as Fahrenheit 451, The Old Man and the Sea, and Ender’s Game. Students will also continue their study of grammar, engage in PSAT practice, create a poetry project, and complete a research paper. Additionally, the instructor will teach techniques of descriptive, narrative, persuasive, and expository writing. Frequent quizzes, projects, tests, essays, and a final exam at the end of each semester are required.


Honors English 2

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 1 (with a "B+" average or better), a qualifying grade on the entrance test, and the recommendation of the English 1 instructor.
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 10

This course introduces sophomores who are reading well above their grade level to an in-depth study of the archetypal structures of literature, and the formal elements of fiction and poetry. Students will continue to study the four basic stories of literature: romance, tragedy, irony/satire, and comedy, focusing especially on romance (The hero’s quest story). In addition to the English 2 readings, honors students will complete units on Julius Caesar and Frankenstein.  Students will also continue their study of grammar, engage in PSAT practice, and learn vocabulary. Honors students will participate in WordWright, a national language arts contest. Writing assignments, (including a research paper), projects, frequent quizzes, tests, essays, and a final exam at the end of each semester are required. Students in Honors English will be expected to do independent and more challenging readings and projects beyond those required in the core English courses.


English 3

Prerequisite: English 2.
1 Credit
Grade 11

This course continues the systematic study of archetypal structures in literature: romance, tragedy, irony/satire, and comedy. Reading selections will emphasize romance and tragedy in poetry, short stories, novels, and film. Shakespearean comedy and tragedy will be studied in Much Ado About Nothing and The Tragedy of Macbeth. Students will learn to write both argument and literary analysis. Research in the library and on the internet is continued. Each student will be responsible for researching a current topic and participating in a debate for the affirmative or negative side. This debate will be held in the theater in front of guest judges. In addition, students will write a substantive research paper on an arguable topic employing MLA format, parenthetical citation, a works cited page, and multiple and reliable sources. Writing assignments, projects, frequent quizzes, tests, and a final exam at the end of each semester are required.


AP English 3 Language & Composition

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors English 2 (with B average or better) or English 2 (with an A average or better) AND the recommendation of the English instructor.
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 11

The purpose of this course is to help students “write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives.” (The College Board, AP® English Course Description, May 2017, p. 8) The course is organized according to the requirements and guidelines of the current AP English Course Description, and, therefore, students are expected to read critically, think analytically, and communicate clearly in both writing and speech.

The course is organized by themes; a few examples are “Understanding Rhetoric,” “Analyzing Rhetoric” and “Popular Culture.” Each unit requires students to acquire and use rich vocabulary, to use standard English grammar, and to understand the importance of diction and author’s style. Therefore, students are expected to develop these skills through reading, discussion, and writing assignments. 

In order for students to be successful in the class, they must keep up with the assigned readings and writing. Among other pieces, AP students will read contemporary non-fiction, The Tragedy of Macbeth, and Cry, the Beloved Country. AP students also participate in WordWright, a national language arts contest. Students enrolled in AP Language and Composition are required to take the AP Language exam in May.


English 4

Prerequisite: English 3.
1 Credit
Grade 12

This course continues the systematic study of archetypal structures in literature: romance, tragedy, irony/satire, and comedy. Reading selections will emphasize tragic and ironic literature from ancient to modern times. Students will read, act, discuss, and write on the great tragedies of Western civilization beginning with Oedipus the King and Antigone through Hamlet and Death of a Salesman. A major research paper written in MLA format with proper internal citation, a works cited page, and a personal interview is a requirement for graduation. The instructor will use a variety of critical approaches, and students will do both group and individual research work. Timed writings, poetry responses, quizzes, tests, and final exams are required.


AP English 4 Literature & Composition 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Language and Composition (with a B Average or better) or English 3 (with an A average or better)  AND the recommendation of the English instructor. Students should demonstrate a genuine interest in reading and discussing serious literature and a desire to fully participate in the course.
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 12

The AP English Literature and Composition course for seniors requires students to closely read challenging texts in poetry, fiction, and drama and to write critically in response to questions arising from the study and discussion of those texts. The course should prepare students to successfully complete the AP Literature exam in May. Because the AP exam requires students to possess a sophisticated vocabulary and an ability to employ specific rhetorical strategies in writing, the course will place an emphasis on the techniques of close reading and literary analysis.

Students will examine a broad range of poems, short stories, novels, and plays. They will be required to write a critical essay or explication each week and at least one longer paper each semester. In the second semester, this longer paper will be a research paper using secondary sources to support a thesis. As the course progresses, students should demonstrate growth in their critical vocabulary and an increasing sophistication in their ability to analyze poems and passages from longer works. In addition, the course will incorporate the principles of archetypal criticism that are emphasized in our regular curriculum throughout the four years. In order for the students to be successful, they must keep up with the assigned readings and writing. In addition to the works studied in English 4, AP students will read Heart of Darkness, Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. AP students also participate in WordWright, a national language arts contest. Students enrolled in AP English are required to take the AP exam in May.

Faculty

Katherine Smith

Katherine Smith

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Katherine earned a BA in Media Arts and Design from James Madison University in 2013. In 2015, she graduated from Old Dominion University with a M.S. in Secondary Education. Katherine is an alumna of Catholic High School. She coaches the award-winning CHS Forensics team and serves as President of the Virginia Catholic Forensics League as of Fall 2017.

Noreen Baker

Noreen Baker

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Mrs. Baker hails from New Jersey and holds a BA degree cum laude in English from Villanova University. She received a. MA degree in English Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she taught introductory composition and literature courses to undergraduates. Mrs. Baker is the former English Department Chair at Catholic High School where she taught AP Literature and Senior English, was the moderator of the Paladin, the literary magazine, and installed a chapter of the National English Honor Society at Catholic High. Mrs. Baker was selected for the Library of Congress summer institute, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery teacher workshop, and the AP teacher summer session at Worchester College, Oxford University. She has been a Reader for the AP Literature exam for seven years. Her three sons are all graduates of Catholic High and two are administrators in Virginia Beach Public Schools.

Trey Clarkson

Trey Clarkson

Titles: Teacher, Director - Barry Robinson Theater and Fine Arts Center
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Trey holds a BA in English from James Madison University and an MA in Theatre from Regent University. He is the Director of the Barry Robinson Theater and Fine Arts Center at CHS as well as the director of the CHS Theater Company. Trey began teaching at CHS in 2000. Trey is also an adjunct professor at ODU, TCC, and Regent as well as a published playwright through Eldridge Publishing.

Michael McCann

Michael McCann

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Michael is originally from Buffalo, New York. He graduated from Buffalo Traditional School in 2002, then served in the U.S. Air Force for 11 years. After spending time in the United Kingdom and South Dakota, he was stationed at Langley AFB in Hampton, VA. He has been in the Hampton Roads area since 2006. After leaving the military, he earned his B.A. in English from Old Dominion University. He previously taught at Bethel High School in Hampton. He and his wife, Angie live in Norfolk with their five kids. He enjoys camping, watching theatre, and traveling. He started teaching at CHS in 2019.

Madison Terry

Madison Terry

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Ms. Terry earned her B.A. degree in English Literature with a minor in Education from Clemson University in May 2019. She currently teaches English 2 and 3 at CHS. In her free time she enjoys reading Flannery O’Connor, antiquing, exploring historical landmarks, painting, and watching Keira Knightley’s Pride and Prejudice with her two cats, Darcy and Bingley.

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World Languages

Willkommen - Salve - Bienvenidos! The ability to communicate in a foreign language is essential in today’s global community. Catholic High School offers a variety of foreign languages: German, Latin and Spanish. To understand the language and culture of each foreign language, students develop competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are exposed to a variety of media to achieve the foreign language goals. Students learn prayers in the target language, participate in foreign language Masses, and experience the Stations of the Cross during Lent. Students who meet the eligibility requirements may join the National Honor Society of the language studied. Language clubs organize additional activities to offer unique cultural experiences. The foreign language requirement at Catholic High School is one (1) foreign language credit for graduation. In order to receive an advanced diploma, students must take at least three (3) years of one foreign language or two (2) years of two different foreign languages. Most universities prefer three or more credits of foreign language. To continue to the next level of foreign language study, students must complete their present course with a "C-" or better, pass the final exam, and have teacher approval.

Courses

German 1

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

This course introduces the student to the German language and will help each student attain an acceptable degree of proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing within the context of the contemporary German-speaking world and its culture. Listening activities revolve around an interesting German video series made especially for teenagers. Students improve their speaking skills by “acting” in skits, videos and singing songs. Writing is emphasized by practicing grammar, describing pictures and communicating with other students in the class. German culture is introduced by comparing and contrasting the various similarities and differences of the American and German cultures, by making and eating German foods, and by celebrating the various German holidays.


German 2

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of German 1, a passing grade on the Final Exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

The four language skills learned in German 1 are practiced and improved. Students will increase their vocabulary and build on their knowledge of German grammar and culture. Meaningful communication in German is emphasized through class conversations, reports, stories, skits, compositions, and the production of original video stories.


German 3

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of German 2 and a passing grade on the final exam and teacher approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

This course includes an intensive study of German grammar and syntax, accompanied by oral and written exercises. Skills on meaningful communication are attained through class discussions, debates, extemporaneous talks, and the production of original video episodes.


AP German Language and Culture

Prerequisites: "B" or better in 2nd semester of German 3, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

The AP German Language and Culture course is a program whose main objective is to develop students’ communication with an emphasis on German culture. Students aim to achieve a high level of ability in all four skills- listening, reading, speaking, and writing-within the context of the contemporary German speaking world. Entering students are expected to comprehend and produce language that is equivalent to that which is used in a second-year college level course. The students will concentrate on vocabulary building and German culture through the readings. Candidates must also have a high level of motivation and interest as well as sufficient time to prepare out-of-class reading and writing assignments. Students enrolled in AP German Language are required to take the AP exam in the spring.


Latin 1

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

The student learns the basic fundamentals of this classical language. Emphasis is placed on learning to read and translate Latin through simple Latin paragraphs and stories. Comparison to English grammar and increasing the student’s English vocabulary through Latin root words are emphasized.  Students learn not only the language of the Romans but also about the history, daily life, and mythology of the Romans.


Latin 2

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of Latin 1, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

The student develops the competency to read increasingly more complex Latin passages. The Latin-English vocabulary and grammar connections continue to be emphasized. The student learns more about the culture and history of Rome, especially the late Republic and the early Empire associated with Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar. Students will start to work with annotated passages of authentic Latin literature.


Latin 3

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of Latin 2, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

Skills learned in Latin 1 and 2 are further developed. In this course students conclude their study of Latin grammar. During this year, students are also introduced to upper level reading selections, both poetry and prose, from Latin authors in preparation for AP Latin study. The student will be encouraged to correlate rhetorical devices and epic poetry with his/her study of English literature.


AP Latin: Caesar and Vergil

Prerequisites: “B” average or better for each semester of Latin III, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

Students will read selections from books I, II, IV and VI of Vergil's Aeneid, as well as selections from Julius Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. Critical appreciation of these works implies the ability to translate literally, and to understand fully these pieces of literature. The student must also demonstrate an ability to write a well-organized essay and have an interest in the mythology, culture, and history of the ancient Greco-Roman world. Students enrolled in AP Latin are required to take the AP exam in the spring.


Spanish 1

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

Elementary Spanish is the first course in a series of five, designed to expose students to spoken modern-day Spanish in a culturally authentic context. This course will focus on listening, reading, speaking and writing. Students will have ample opportunities to demonstrate these skills in a variety of forms. Students will also learn about the customs and traditions inherent to daily life of Hispanic communities such as the importance of the extended family, holidays, historic events and food. Those enrolled will be afforded the opportunity to sample various dishes by cooking for their peers. These are but a few of the activities that await those who take Spanish 1.


Spanish 2

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of Spanish 1, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit
Grades 10-12

The basic objective of this course is to review and explain all important material from Spanish 1 and to continue to introduce new material so that the student’s knowledge of Spanish language and culture will grow and that the student’s proficiency in the four language skills will improve. Students will gain knowledge of the Hispanic culture through a variety of activities such as games, movies, videos and music.


Spanish 3

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of Spanish 2, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

This course continues the objectives of Spanish 1 and 2 with the added goal of completing the introduction of new structures. Students will continue to practice the four language skills with added emphasis on speaking and writing with longer reading selections. Students will practice in depth what they have learned in Spanish 1 and 2.


Spanish 4

Prerequisites: "C-" or better in 2nd semester of Spanish 3, a passing grade on the final exam, and teacher approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

The objectives of the course are designed to expand the goals of Spanish 3. Students will gain greater proficiency in their language skills and will learn more about Hispanic culture through readings, popular music and videos. The curriculum will include a structural approach to the Spanish language through contextual grammar and interactive conversation, as well as, an introduction to Hispanic culture through various media in order to refine the student’s language skills.


AP Spanish Language and Culture

Prerequisites: “A” or better in each Semester of Spanish 3, "A-" or better in each semester of Spanish 4, and teacher recommendation.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

The AP Spanish Language course is a program whose main objective is to develop students’ communication with an emphasis on grammar skills in Spanish. Students aim to achieve a high level of ability in all four skills- listening, reading, speaking, and writing-within the context of the contemporary Spanish-speaking world. Entering students are expected to comprehend and produce language that is equivalent to that which is used in a second-year college level course. The students will concentrate on vocabulary building and Hispanic culture through the readings of authentic news articles, videos, readings, radio presentations, etc.. Candidates must also have a high level of motivation and interest as well as sufficient time to prepare out-of-class reading and writing assignments. Students enrolled in AP Spanish Language are required to take the AP exam in the spring.

Faculty

Nicole Laroussi

Nicole Laroussi

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Email:
Biography:

Nicole received her BA and MA from the University of Tennessee and taught previously at the University of Tennessee, Old Dominion University, and the Webb School of Knoxville. She sponsors the German Club and is moderator for the Senior class and the German National Honor Society. Nicole started teaching at CHS in 1999.

Suzanne Jimenez-Glenn

Suzanne Jimenez-Glenn

Titles: Teacher
Email:
Biography:

Suzanne earned her BA in Spanish from Virginia Wesleyan and attended la Universidad Madero in Puebla, Mexico. She is a Head Freshman Class moderator and sponsors the Morning Announcement Filming and the National Spanish Honor Society. She has also taught English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and Methods in Teaching in Puebla, Puebla and travels throughout Mexico during the summers. Suzanne began teaching at BSCHS in 2002.

Liliana Quiroga

Liliana Quiroga

Titles: Teacher
Email:
Biography:

Sra. Quiroga received her BA in foreign languages at Pontificia Bolivariana University, Medellin, Colombia. S.A. She then came to the United States where she received her MA in ESL at West Virginia University. She began teaching at CHS in 2005.

Matthew Randall

Matthew Randall

Titles: Teacher
Email:

Health, Physical Education & Drivers Education

The health and physical education curriculum is designed to foster a positive self-image for all students. With the rising trend in adolescent obesity, health and physical education has become even more critical for the youth of today. During freshman PE classes, students are provided opportunities to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully participate in a variety of physical activities. Emphasis is placed upon those sports and activities that can be performed throughout much of one’s life. The various elective courses help students develop an understanding of how to make lifestyle changes to better their health and wellness, as well as that of the community.

Courses

Physical Education 

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grade 9

Students in Physical Education will experience a wide variety of lifetime sports and activities including golf, tennis, team handball and various recreational games. Every two weeks a new activity or sport will be introduced with students gaining sport-specific skills, a historical perspective of the sport, and demonstrating positive interactions with other students in a game situation. The goal of the class is to introduce students to a variety of activities so they will have the knowledge and experience needed to choose an activity that meets their personal needs/desires not only now, but when they graduate from high school.


Drivers Education/Health Education

Prerequisites: Physical Education.
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

This is a combination class that allows students to complete the state requirement for the textbook portion of driver’s education and examine current topics related to health and wellness. The driver education program follows all Department of Education guidelines for classroom instruction. Health education class will cover topics such as nutrition, wellness, and systems of the body. 


In-Car Driver Education

Prerequisites: Classroom Drivers’ Education and Learner’s Permit.
Grades 10-12

This course is open to students in grades 10-12. Each student is required to complete the classroom portion of driver’s education as set forth by the State of Virginia. Students are required to complete 45 driving hours with a parent or guardian with 15 of those hours being after sunset.  A fee is charged to cover expenses.


First Aid/Safety/CPR/AED

Prerequisite: Physical Education.
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Students will learn the concepts and practice the skills of Basic First Aid, CPR and AED. This course provides reasons for learning first aid, and explains the value of first aid. Topics include techniques for dealing with shock, burns, poisoning (including alcohol poisoning), sudden illness as well as control of bleeding wounds and other emergency situations. This course is hands-on with students demonstrating the skills of first aid, CPR and AED. Upon completion of the required skills and knowledge tests, students may be certified by the American Red Cross.


Nutrition and Strength Training (NST) 1

Prerequisites: Physical Education.
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

NST 1 is an introductory course designed to develop an understanding of nutritional needs, as well as an introduction to the anatomy and physiology related to strength training. Through the use of a computerized diet analysis program, a dietary assessment will be conducted and presented as part of the required coursework, as well as current research on an ergogenic aid. Strength training and spotting techniques will be taught and used by students enrolled in the course. This course will strive to assist students in the areas of self-esteem, self-confidence, goal setting, and developing a positive work ethic.


Nutrition and Strength Training (NST) 2

Prerequisites: Physical Education and NST 1.
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Nutrition and Strength Training 2 is designed to continue strength training activities while becoming more proficient in training program design and implementation. Current research in nutrition and performance will be reviewed and critiqued with each progressive NST section requiring further research, and more difficult topics related to NST. In addition, through the use of a computerized diet analysis program, a dietary assessment will be conducted and presented as part of the required coursework, as well as current research on an ergogenic aid. This course will strive to assist students in the areas of self-esteem, self-confidence, goal setting, and developing a positive work ethic.


Sports Theory and Application 1 (First Semester Only)/ 2 (Second Semester Only)

Prerequisite: Physical Education.
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Sports Theory and Application is designed for those students looking to further their knowledge in a variety of sports. The course will include teaching advanced team strategies, refinement of critical sport skills, field set-up (including official dimensions), and how to competently officiate a wide variety of sports. In addition, the following topics will be taught as part of the classroom component: principles of coaching, history of sport and the Olympics, sports psychology, professionalism in sports, and sportsmanship( depending on the semester being taken, fall or spring ).
 

Faculty

Barbara Green

Barbara Green

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Barbara earned a BS from the University of Louisville, a BS from Old Dominion University and an MEd from Norfolk State University. She is the Driver's Education coordinator for the school as well as an in-car Driver's Ed instructor. Two of her children graduated from Catholic High. Barbara started teaching at Catholic High School (BSCHS) in 1995.

Kristin Patterson

Kristin Patterson

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Kristin earned her BA in Physical and Health Education in 2014 and her M.A.Ed in Sports Leadership and Coaching in 2018 from West Liberty University. Kristin is a National Exercise Trainer Association recognized Group Fitness Instructor and a Freshman Class Moderator. Kristin is also a military spouse and mother who has a heart for serving other military families at CHS.

Mathematics

The Mathematics Department of Catholic High School offers courses which are sequential, with each course building upon the preceding one. Logic, recognition of mathematical patterns, computation, critical thinking, and mathematical insight are stressed in all aspects of the math program. Students must complete three credits in mathematics as the minimum graduation requirement. A typical college preparatory math program will include Advanced Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, and Pre-Calculus. Students who are accelerated in middle school and who complete the above courses before 12th grade are encouraged and expected to take Advanced Placement Calculus.

Courses

Advanced Algebra 1

Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

This course is open to all students grades 9-12 who have no previous Algebra 1 credit, dependent on a qualifying test score. In the first semester, this course treats computations with signed numbers, linear equations, polynomials, graphing lines and systems of linear equations, and solution of some quadratic equations. The second semester material includes linear inequalities, rational expressions, rational/irrational numbers, and the quadratic formula. Calculators are not used in Advanced Algebra 1. Students need to demonstrate a pencil and paper proficiency with basic number facts, relationships, and computations.


Geometry

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Advanced Algebra 1
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

This college preparatory course is open to students who have completed Algebra 1 or Advanced Algebra 1. The Geometry course includes an in-depth analysis of plane, solid, and coordinate geometry as they relate to both abstract mathematical concepts as well as real-world problem situations. Topics include logic and proof, parallel lines and polygons, perimeter and area analysis, volume and surface area analysis, similarity and congruence, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical thinking skills as they relate to logical reasoning and argument. Students will be required to use knowledge acquired in Algebra 1 to discover and explain much of the course content.


Intermediate Algebra

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1 (or Advanced Algebra 1), Geometry, and teacher recommendation.
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

The course will allow students to gain the fundamental math skills that we require of our students as a college preparatory program. This course will be the bridge that some students need to be prepared for and successful in Algebra 2. The course will include remediation of math facts, basic math skills with fractions and decimals, drilling key skills needed for Algebra 2 and above, and introduce some of the basic ideas taught in Algebra 2 that are also on the SAT.


Algebra 2

Prerequisites: Qualifying Placement Test score, completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry (both with a "C" average or higher), and teacher recommendation.
1 Credit
Grade 9-12

This course extends the topics introduced in Algebra One (linear and quadratic relations and functions) as well as applications of these concepts. Additional topics include three variable systems, the imaginary number system, the complex number system, rudimentary probability, sequences/series, and solving exponential and logarithmic equations. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.


Honors Algebra 2

Prerequisites: Qualifying Placement test score,  Algebra 1 (with a B average or higher), Geometry (with a "C" average or higher), and teacher recommendation.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 9-12

This is an honors-level math course dealing in an extended study of the topic listed for Algebra 2. Included in this accelerated class are additional units on trigonometric functions and equations, and on analytic trigonometry. All units are covered more deeply and at a faster pace than in the regular Algebra 2 course. Only students with a high algebra score on our placement test should attempt the honors class. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required. 


College Algebra

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (with a “C-” or higher in each semester)
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

This course is similar in content to a college algebra course. It covers topics in discrete functions, data exploration, and right triangle relationships. This course is designed for Algebra 2 students who do not meet the prerequisites for  Pre-Calculus w/Trig. Successful completion of College Algebra will prepare students to take  Pre-Calculus w/Trig. A TI-84 graphing Calculator is required. The content is closely aligned with the TCC MATH 158 College Algebra course.


Statistics

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (with a "C" average or higher)
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

This course covers the topics of exploring data, modeling distributions of data, describing relationships, designing studies, probability, random variables, sampling distribution, estimating with confidence, testing a claim, comparing two populations or groups, inference for distributions of categorical data, and regression. These topics should provide sufficient preparation for the AP Statistics examination—if desired.  If time permits, additional units may cover analysis of variance and multiple and logistic regression. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.


Pre-Calculus w/ Trig

Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2 (with a “B-” or higher in each semester) OR College Algebra (with a “C” or higher)
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10 –12

This course begins with a review of previous algebra and geometry concepts and then covers linear and quadratic functions and relations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and their applications, polar coordinates and vectors, analytic geometry  (specifically the conic sections), systems of equations and inequalities, sequences and series, counting and probability, and an introduction to calculus. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Pre-Calculus is required for students who intend to complete through the level of AP Calculus. It is also strongly recommended for students who plan to complete Calculus in most post-secondary programs.


AP Calculus (AB)

Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus w/ Trig (with a “C” average or higher in each semester) and teacher recommendation.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

This two-semester course covers the typical material in a first semester college calculus course. Topics include limits, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential relations. Successful completion of the AP test in May typically results in one semester of college credit. Students enrolled in AP Calculus are required to take the AP exam in the spring. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.


AP Calculus (BC)

Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus w/ Trig (with a “B” average or higher in each semester) and teacher recommendation.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

This two-semester course covers the typical material in two semesters of college calculus. The course deals with all of the topics of the AB course and the additional topics of differential equations, analytic geometry, parametric and polar equations, and infinite series. Successful completion of the AP test in May typically results in two semesters of college credit. Students enrolled in AP Calculus are required to take the AP exam in the spring. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.


Multivariate Calculus

Prerequisite: Completion of AP Calculus (BC) (with a "C" average or higher)
½  Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

This course includes the topics beyond those covered in Advanced Placement Calculus:  vectors and the geometry of space, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector analysis.  If time allows, a unit on differential equations may be added. The content is closely aligned with the TCC MATH 277 Vector Calculus course.


Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: Completion of Multivariate Calculus (with a "C" average or higher)
½  Credit weighted
Grades 11-12

This course includes the topics matrices, vector spaces, determinants, solutions of systems of linear equations, basis and dimension, Eigenvalues, and Eigenvectors.  The content is closely aligned with the MIT MATH 18.06 MOOC Linear Algebra course.

Faculty

Charles Woods

Charles Woods

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

After traveling the globe while serving 22 years in the Navy and retiring as a Chief in 2010, Charles earned his B.S. in Mathematics from Old Dominion University. He taught two years for Norfolk Public Schools before coming to Catholic High in 2015. He stepped into the Department Chair role in 2017. He is an avid escape room enthusiast.

Joseph Bousquet

Joseph Bousquet

Titles: Teacher, Rowing and Sailing Coach
Roles: Faculty & Staff, Coach
Email:
Biography:

Joe earned his BS in Mathematics and MSEd degrees from Old Dominion University. Joe began teaching at Catholic High in 1998 and was Department Chair 2002-2017. Additionally, Joe started the Rowing and Sailing programs at CHS and coaches both teams. Joe and his wife Susan are alumni of Norfolk Catholic High School.

Scott Melson

Scott Melson

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Scott earned his BS in mathematics from Old Dominion University. He began teaching at BSCHS in 2014. In addition he is an adjunct math instructor at Tidewater Community College. Scott enjoys spending time with his family, playing golf and fishing.

Nancy Nelson

Nancy Nelson

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Nancy comes to CHS after a twenty-five-year career in computer consulting and 13 years teaching high school math. She has both a BS and MS in Computer Science, and a minor in electrical engineering, from The University of Virginia. She also has 27 graduate math credits in Applied Math from Old Dominion University. Her family includes her husband, Mr. Jim Frandsen, and a blended family of five adult children along with her very elderly mother at home.

Donovan Waefler

Donovan Waefler

Titles: Teacher, Athletics Director Asst., Baseball Coach, Football Asst Coach
Roles: Faculty & Staff, Coach
Email:

Sciences

The Science Department of Catholic High School offers a sequence of science courses to help prepare every student for college and life. The four core laboratory science courses offered at CHS, which comprise the college preparatory sequence, include GeoScience, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Students entering high school with credit GeoScience will take Integrated Science. In addition, the department offers a variety of enriching electives. Some of these electives offer college credit through Advanced Placement examinations. In the science department, students are encouraged to exploit their natural curiosity and wonder to find logic and patterns in nature, thus building critical thinking and problem solving skills that will serve them throughout life. Science should be exciting and fun as well as challenging and demanding. Some students may be encouraged to accelerate their science program of study, but there are courses suitable for all students.  

Honors/AP Selection: Students taking these courses will be identified by Science grades consistently above average (B or better) and their Science teacher's recommendation. Incoming students for Honors-level courses will be selected based on their Honors Qualifying test score. 

Courses

GeoScience (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grade 9

This class provides the student with a broad understanding of topics in Astronomy, Geology, Oceanography, and Meteorology. Primary goals are to show the connections between these branches of science and the role imagination plays in scientific discovery, and to equip the student with basic problem-solving skills needed in high school science classes. Projects will require students to become familiar with data collection and analysis, internet research techniques, and electronic presentation programs. Curiosity and enthusiasm along with mastering some basic mathematical relationships are key to success in this introductory class. This is the usual course for entering freshmen without high school credit science.


Integrated Science (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: Earth Science (High School Credit).
1 Credit
Grade 9

This survey course provides the student with a broad understanding of topics in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Earth Science. Primary goals are to show the connections between these branches of science and the role imagination plays in scientific discovery, and to equip the student with basic problem-solving skills needed in high school science classes. Projects will require students to become familiar with data collection and analysis, internet research techniques, and electronic presentation programs. Curiosity and enthusiasm along with mastering some basic mathematical relationships are key to success in this introductory class. This is the usual course for Freshmen students who have completed a course in Earth Science.


Biology (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: GeoScience.
1 Credit
Grade 10

(Core Science course) This course continues to use the student’s natural sense of curiosity to explore the biological sciences. The major goal of the biology course is to foster an appreciation for the intricacy and the diversity of living things with which we share our planet, and to practice learning skills that are critical for success in college. Living beings are examined from three perspectives: the molecular, the individual organism and populations of organisms interacting in ecological balance. Man’s role in the naturally evolved balance is critically examined. This is the normal course for Sophomores.


Honors Biology (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: GeoScience or Integrated Science (with “B” average or higher), Algebra 1 (with “B” average or higher), and Departmental Honors Qualifying Test.
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 9/10

(Core Science course) Living beings are examined from three perspectives: the molecular, the individual organism, and populations of organisms interacting in ecological balance. The major goal of the Honors Biology course is to foster an appreciation for the diversity of living things with which we share our planet. Man’s role in the naturally evolved balance is critically examined. Topics are examined with an emphasis on Marine Biology, to a greater depth, and at a faster pace than in the college preparatory Biology course.


Chemistry (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisites: Biology (with “C” average or higher) AND Algebra 1 (with “C” average or higher); Algebra 2 or higher is a co-requisite.
1 Credit
Grades 11-12

(Core Science course) This is a high school college preparatory Chemistry course which is an overview of the subject of Chemistry and provides the student with the necessary fundamentals to proceed to an introductory Chemistry class in college.  This may be the last Chemistry course a student may take and thus discusses the core topics in reference to the world around them. Chemical nomenclature, equations and mathematical applications in problem solving will be emphasized.  Other topics include matter and energy, phases of matter, atomic structure and bonding, the periodic table, stoichiometry, solutions, kinetics and equilibrium, acids, bases and salts, oxidation-reduction reactions, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory experiences will be structured and oriented towards solving problems connected to central concepts in which data analysis is emphasized. This is the normal course for Juniors.


Honors Chemistry (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisites: Honors Biology (with “B” average or higher) or Biology (with a “B+” average or higher), Algebra 1 (with “B” average or higher), and Department Honor Qualifying Test. Algebra 2 is a corequisite.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

(Core Science course) This course is designed to prepare a student for any of the science courses that he/she might encounter in college. The lectures, laboratories and homework assignments give the students an idea of the intensity of college work, while providing them a solid foundation in the understanding of Chemistry needed to be an informed citizen today. Honors Chemistry covers the same topics as Chemistry, but in a more comprehensive manner and at a faster pace. Concepts such as the quantum-mechanical model, bonding, thermodynamics, and equilibrium are covered in significant detail. Data analysis is the emphasis in laboratory work. The course is designed for highly motivated students whose university plans may include majoring in one of the sciences or engineering fields. This course may be taken by qualifying students in place of the regular Chemistry course.


Organic and Biological Chemistry/Design Frontiers (Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisite: Chemistry or Honors Chemistry, Algebra 2.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

This course is a two-semester sequence of chemistry designed to introduce students to the chemistry of carbon-based compounds and their role in biological and environmental systems. Topics to be covered include the structure, nomenclature, and reactivity of organic compounds, the structure and function of important biomolecules, and the chemistry of metabolic pathways.  There will be a laboratory component of the course emphasizing basic quantitative and qualitative procedures used in organic chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical engineering. An overview of current diagnostic, design, and analysis laboratory techniques and technology will be highlighted. This course is excellent preparation for those students who wish to pursue advanced study of chemistry at the college level, specifically those interested in the fields of biology, chemistry, medicine, technology, engineering, and health professions.  


AP Chemistry (Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisite: Biology (with “B” Average or higher), Chemistry (with “B” Average or higher), and Departmental Approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry.  Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.   AP Chemistry is intended as a second year high school chemistry course, to be taken after an introductory course in chemistry. Students in this course are expected to go beyond the simple recall of chemical facts, and be able to understand chemistry, apply its facts, and interpret and explain data and observations from experiments.  Self-discipline and self-motivation are necessary to complete this course successfully. Emphasis is placed on independent learning of concepts presented in lecture and lab.  Many colleges and universities award college credit for the successful completion of this course and an acceptable performance on the AP examination administered in the spring. Students in AP Chemistry are required to take the AP Chemistry examination given by the College Board in May.  For more information about the AP course and exam, visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse/ap-chemistry


Marine Biology (Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisite:  Chemistry (with a C+ or higher).
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

Marine Biology is a higher-level elective course designed to challenge students to apply their current understanding of biology and chemistry to the organisms found in the ocean. The course will examine taxonomy, evolution, ecology, behavior, and physiology of selected groups of marine organisms. Interrelationships between living things and marine geology, marine physics, and marine chemistry will be also be considered. 


AP Biology (Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisite: Biology (with “B” Average or higher), Chemistry (with “B” Average or higher), and Departmental Approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

AP Biology is a second course in Biology. It is designed to introduce the advanced high school student to the requirements and rigor of fast-paced college science courses. Self-discipline and motivation are necessary to complete this course successfully. Emphasis is placed on the laboratory aspect of Biology. Many colleges and universities award college credit for the successful completion of the course and acceptable performance on the AP examination administered in the spring. It is recommended as a means of fulfilling college science graduation requirements for the non-science major. Students in AP Biology must take the final examination as given by the College Board in May.


Environmental Science (Non-Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisite: Biology AND completion of, or enrollment in, Geometry.
1 Credit
Grades 11-12

Environmental Science provides an introduction to Ecology and provides a framework for an understanding of modern environmental concerns.  This course provides insight into the problems facing policy makers at all levels. The course is being taught in two parts. The first semester will be taught using the concepts of environmental science.   Part two uses environmental principles to study the human population and its changes to the environment starting with the evolution of modern man and continuing through the environmental problems facing the Earth today.  The curriculum includes both field studies and laboratory work. Although this course does not qualify as a lab science for our graduation requirement, students who achieve "C" or better for both semesters of this course may go on to Chemistry.


AP Environmental Science (Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisite: Biology (with “B” Average or higher), Chemistry (with “B” Average or higher), and Departmental Approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

AP Environmental Science is a course designed to be completed in two-semesters (the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course in environmental science). The course follows the goals and objectives set forth by the College Board. Specifically, the goal of the APES course is to provide the students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. All students enrolled in APES are expected to take the AP exam.


Physics (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry with a “C” or Chemistry with a “B-“ and co-requisite: Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2 with a “B-."
1 Credit
Grades 11-12


(Core Science course) Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of the relationships between matter and energy. In addition, they will learn why it is incorrect to say that “hot air rises” or that “the interior of the sun is hot.” They will engage in activities, labs and simulations that will enable them to understand the underlying physical concepts that apply to most of the world around them, including motion, force, energy momentum, gravity, electricity, sound, light and electromagnetism (such as radio, TV and microwave). With a slightly reduced emphasis on mathematical problem solving, this course is designed for the student who is intrigued by scientific discovery but does not have the math preparation for problem based physics.


AP Physics 1 (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 2 (with a "B" or higher), or Algebra 2 (with a “B+” or higher) and co-requisite: Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, or higher math. 
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 11-12

(Core Science Course) This course examines the far-reaching and powerful world of Physics. Through analysis of scientific thinking and the vocabulary and symbols of science, students will develop an understanding of what Physics can tell us about the world we live in.  In particular, students will see how mathematics such as algebra, geometry and trigonometry can be applied to describe nature and gain insight into the physical world. Considerable time will be devoted to hands-on laboratory investigations meant to thoroughly involve students in the process of scientific inquiry.  This course is designed to cover topics normally encountered in the first semester of college Physics, such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational and angular motion), work and energy, mechanical waves and sound, as well as an introduction to electric circuits.  Students in AP Physics 1 are expected to take the final examination as given by the College Board in May.


AP Physics 2 (Lab Science/Elective)

Prerequisites:  AP Physics 1 AND Departmental Approval.
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 11-12

This course is designed as a second-year Physics course that follows the completion of AP Physics 1.  This class is designed to cover the material from the second semester of a college Physics class.  AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2 combined cover the material normally covered in the first two semesters of college physics.  The focus of this course includes topics that will especially benefit students who plan to major in Pre-Med or other Life Science majors in college.  These topics include fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics.  Hands-on, student-led inquiry will be given significant emphasis in the course along with proper scientific methods and experimentation.  Students in AP Physics 2 are expected to take the final examination as given by the College Board in May. 


Astronomy

Prerequisite: Chemistry.
½ Credit
Grade 11-12

This course addresses the world outside of the earth and its atmosphere. As most online sources are government sites, the entire class will be taught from the internet. Numerous textbooks will be available in the classroom, but students should expect to do research online and take notes online. This course stresses the continuing quest for knowledge and examines topics related to the solar system, the universe and cosmology. Field trips to planetariums and a star gazing overnight venture are planned. Research topics include: singularities, the future of the universe, the electromagnetic spectrum, our solar system and galaxy, relativity, quantum mechanics and string theory.


Meteorology

Prerequisite: Chemistry.
½ Credit
Grade 11-12

This course continues to reward the student’s natural curiosity about the world around them. Meteorology presents a non-technical overview of basic atmospheric science covering climate, weather, clouds, winds, weather maps and forecasting. This course stresses the relationships between people and their weather environment. Students are required to develop and present a daily weather forecast. A single writing exercise is required.


Anatomy and Physiology (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: Biology (with a “B-” average or higher) and Chemistry (with a “C” average or higher).
½ Credit
Grades 11-12

The intricate and fascinating structure and function of human body will be examined in this one-semester course. The cellular, tissue, and organ levels of selected organ systems of the body will be studied. This course is designed for students that desire an in-depth knowledge of the body’s systems in both health and disease and will continue with the Forensic Science course in the second semester. The course material will be presented in both lecture and laboratory formats.


Forensic Science (Lab Science/Core Sequence)

Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology (with a “C” average or higher).
½ Credit
Grades: 11-12

This second-semester course will introduce Forensic Science, the application of science to the law. The history of science, evaluation of crime scenes and physical evidence, and methods of identification of suspects will be studied. Students enrolled must have successfully completed the Anatomy and Physiology course in the previous semester.


Independent Study Science

Prerequisite: Vary; dependent upon the topic AND Departmental Approval.
½ Credit Weighted (per semester)
Grade 12


This course allows exploration of topics of interest to both student and sponsoring faculty member. This is a course designed primarily for Seniors who wish to pursue some aspect of science beyond the scope of what is normally offered and who are capable of working independently while meeting deadlines. In general, the format would include a weekly meeting with the instructor, a comprehensive examination and an in-depth research paper on the topic mutually selected. Topics must be approved prior to June 1 for the following Fall semester and December 1 for the Spring semester.

Faculty

Carol Stapanowich

Carol Stapanowich

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Carol holds a BS in Toxicology from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and an MS and PhD in Toxicology from the University of Rochester. She is currently the Coach CHS' award-winning Blue Crab Bowl team. In 2012 Carol was presented with the Outstanding Biology Teacher award from the Virginia Association of Biology Teachers and the National Association of Biology Teachers. Carol began teaching at BSCHS in 2005.

Jennifer Adamski

Jennifer Adamski

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Jennifer earned her BS in Chemistry from Villanova University, and her MS in Chemistry from the University of Virginia. She taught College Chemistry and Organic Chemistry at Old Dominion University for 15 years, and Introduction to Physical Science at Norfolk State University. She worked as a professional chemistry tutor, and an educational consultant for McGraw Hill Higher Education. Jennifer served as a substitute teacher at CHS during the 2015-2016 school year, and joined the faculty full time in 2016. She teaches AP Chemistry, Honors Chemistry, and Chemistry, and serves as an SCA moderator, Junior class moderator, Chemistry Club moderator, and Medical Club moderator.

Cheryl Beauchamp

Cheryl Beauchamp

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Cheryl earned her BS in Computer Science and Physics from The University of Notre Dame of Maryland, her MS in Computer Science from George Mason University, her M. Ed from Regent University, and is currently a PhD student of Engineering at Virginia Tech. After working professionally as a software engineer, she switched careers to pursue her passion for teaching. She currently instructs and serves as chair of the Engineering & Computer Science department of Regent University, contributes to NSF grant funded research in cybersecurity, engineering & STEM education, and directs several outreach efforts to promote STEM education and persistence. Cheryl joins CHS as a guest instructor for Cyber Literacy & Robotics, AP Computer Science Principles, and AP Computer Science A. She also serves as the coach for the CHS Cyber Crusaders who compete annually in regional and national cybersecurity competitions. Cheryl is married with four children, CHS ’16, ’17, ’21, and ’23.

Patrick Cavallario

Patrick Cavallario

Titles: Teacher, Golf Head Coach
Roles: Faculty & Staff, Coach
Email:
Biography:

Pat earned his BS in Biology from Christopher Newport University and an MA in Teaching from Wesley College. He teaches most of entering freshmen in Integrated Science, or Earth Science. Pat began teaching at BSCHS in 2011.

Jennifer McMullen

Jennifer McMullen

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Jennifer started teaching at CHS in 2012. Jennifer earned her BS in Zoology from Oregon State University, an MA in Teaching from Columbia College, and an MS in Chemical and Life Sciences from the University of Maryland. She is the head senior class moderator, co-moderator of SNHS, co-coach of the Blue Crab Bowl Team, and SciFi Club moderator. She teaches Anatomy and Physiology, Forensic Science, Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, and Environmental Science. Jennifer also enjoys assisting with campus ministry retreats and the annual APES oyster nursery field study. She and her husband, Josh love living at the Oceanfront with their three children, dog, and two cats. Jennifer also enjoys running, reading, learning new things, going to the beach, and sewing.

William Silkman

William Silkman

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Bill retired from a thirty-year career as a Naval Officer serving as a Surface Warfare Officer and Naval Nuclear Propulsion Engineer, culminating as a Reactor Officer on a nuclear powered aircraft carrier. He earned a Bachelor's Degree in Electrical Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University and a Master's Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College. He is certified as a Professional Engineer in Electrical Engineering in the state of Virginia. Bill and his wife Linda have two children, Noah and Chessie. The family lives in Hampton, VA.

History and Social Sciences

The purpose of the History and Social Sciences Department at Catholic High School is to help our community become aware of its role as active citizens in a changing world. To this end, we strive to give our students a knowledge base that will enable them to become culturally literate in the disciplines of History and the Social Sciences, which at CHS encompasses World History, AP World History, World Regions, AP United States History, United States History, AP United States Government and Politics,Ap Comparative Government and Politics and United States Government.

Courses

World History I

Prerequisite: None.
1 Credit
Grade 9

This course is designed to acquaint students with the history, geography, and cultures of major regions of the world. Students study classical civilizations such as Greece, Rome, India, and China. Map and globe skills, decision-making, critical thinking, research, and group activities are stressed. Emphasis is placed on civilizations up to the Renaissance. Current technology is implemented into the curriculum, when applicable.


World History II

Prerequisite: World History I.
1 Credit
Grade 9/10

This course continues the examination of human societies from 1500 AD to contemporary times. Students engage in critical thinking about lesson content and integrate the study of geography, economics, the humanities, and scientific achievements into the study of world history. Current technology is implemented into the curriculum, when applicable.


World Regions

Prerequisite: World History II.
1 Credit
Grade 10

World Regions examines the major regions and subregions of the world to develop an
understanding of the factors that affect the world’s distribution of people, resources, and human
activities. As students study the unique physical and cultural characteristics of the world’s
regions, they will develop an understanding of the relationships between people and their
environments, the role of the level of technology in the use of resources, and the factors that
affect the quality of life and standard of living. Current international conflicts, international rivalries,
and environmental problems are explored to develop and expand geographic concepts and critical
thinking and to provide concrete illustrations of the ways in which geography influences our
lives. Emphasis is also placed on developing vocabulary, mastering key place-name locations, map and globe skills, and understanding the basic features of the physical environment and culture.


AP World History: Modern

Prerequisites: Successful completion of World History I OR World History II with a "B+" or higher, recommendation of World History instructor, and strong reading and writing skills, evidenced by earning a qualifying score on the placement test.  The placement test will include an essay and multiple choice questions based on the content of World History I and will be given during the spring semester.
1 Credit weighted
Grade 10


AP World History examines the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The course will have as its chronological framework the period from approximately 600 C.E. to the present, with an introductory unit of study called “Foundations,” that presents an overview of mankind’s previous developments. AP World History focuses on the economic, cultural, environmental, and political connection of global history. The course emphasizes critical thinking skills and the analytical writing skills necessary for success in a college level history course. Considerable time is devoted to the evaluation of primary documents and the successful writing of document based questions (DBQ). Students in AP World History are required to take the final examination given by the College Board in May.


United States History

Prerequisite: World History I and/or II.
1 Credit
Grade 11

This course provides students the opportunity to chronologically study the development of the United States of America from discovery and colonization to the present. Students analyze political ideas and events as well as the social, economic, and cultural changes that have influenced the growth of the nation. The art of public speaking is encouraged. The geographic features of the nation are emphasized. A discussion of current events is precursory to each lesson.


AP U.S. History

Prerequisites: Successful completion of AP World History with a grade of “B” OR an “A” in World History AND recommendation by World History instructor.
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 11

Advanced Placement United States History provides highly motivated students the opportunity to develop analytical skills necessary to deal critically with issues of American History beginning with the discovery of America through modern foreign policy. This course is designed to provide a college-level experience and preparation for the AP Exam in May.  An emphasis is placed on interpreting documents, mastering a significant body of factual information, and writing critical essays. Topics include life and thought in colonial America, revolutionary ideology, constitutional development, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, nineteenth-century reform movements, and Manifest Destiny. Other topics include the Civil War and Reconstruction, immigration, industrialism, Populism, Progressivism, World War I, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the post-Cold War era, and the United States at the beginning of the twenty-first century.  Students in AP United States History are required to take the final examination given by the College Board in May and high scores may earn college credit.


American Government

Prerequisites: World History I and/or II and United States History.
1 Credit
Grade 12

Not only is this course an in-depth study of the United States Constitution, it provides historical perspective. Students analyze how history profoundly affects contemporary American politics and how we employ our living past to make future policy decisions. Included in the curriculum are the guarantees of civil liberty, citizenship, public opinion, political parties, the three branches of government, the federal bureaucracy, comparative economic and political systems, and state and local governments. While each student is required to write and defend a research paper on a landmark Supreme Court decision, technology and problem-based assignments also facilitate the development of critical thinking skills.


AP U.S. Gov't & Politics and AP Comparative Gov’t & Politics

Prerequisites: Successful completion of AP United States History with a grade of “B," or with an "A" in United States History, AND recommendation by US History instructor. Evaluation will also include the applicant’s first semester examination grade.
1 Credit Weighted
Grade 12

In the first semester of this Advanced Placement course, students examine the historical roots and application of the United States Constitution from the late eighteenth century to the present. Designed for highly motivated students, critical thinking skills are enhanced through technology and problem-based assignments that ask students to weigh evidence, evaluate differing viewpoints, synthesize information, devise informed positions, and defend their ideas. Students in AP U.S. Government and Politics are required to take the final examination given by the College Board in May and high scores may earn college credit.
In the second semester, students will cover concepts involved with AP Comparative Gov’t and Politics, which will introduce students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes.  The countries examined in this course are: Great Britain, Mexico, Iran, Nigeria, China and Russia. Students in AP U.S. Gov’t/Comparative Politics are required to take the final examinations for each course given by the College Board in May. High scores may earn college credit for two courses.

Faculty

Linda McCubbins

Linda McCubbins

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Linda earned her BA in History and MA in Humanities (emphasis on US history) from Old Dominion University. She is the Department Chair for Social Studies and History, and moderator for Model UN and Operation Smile. She also serves as a Senior Class moderator and for the past 13 years, as a table leader/reader for the AP United States Government and Politics reading in Salt Lake City, Utah. Linda graduated from Norfolk Catholic HS in 1976 and began teaching at BSCHS in 2001.

Thomas Hostutler

Thomas Hostutler

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Tom earned his BA in History from James Madison University. Tom began teaching at BSCHS in 2013. Tom is the moderator of the National History Honor Society.

Sarah Orleans

Sarah Orleans

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Sarah received her BA in History from Longwood University. She is a sophomore class moderator and sponsors the National Honor Society. Sarah began teaching in 2007 and has been at Catholic High School since 2013. While at Catholic, Sarah has taught Advanced Placement World History, World History I, World History II, United States History, and Geography. She greatly values the learning process and enjoys strengthening her curriculum knowledge and curating an engaging classroom.

Christine Sweeney

Christine Sweeney

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:

Fine Arts & Technology

Express your creativity! Have you always wanted to Draw? Make Pottery? Learn to paint? Learn to use your Digital Camera? Sing? Act? Play your musical instrument? Learn how to create digital art and 3D printing. For one hour every day, come create and explore in our fully equipped studio, computer, musical, and theater facilities. Our professional exhibiting artist and performance instructors will help you find your creative voice.

Courses

FINE ART

Art 1 

Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

Art 1 is a survey course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of the visual arts. While largely a studio course, students will regularly study topics in art appreciation, art history and culture, and art forms not covered in the studio portion of the course. The studio portion will include the fundamentals of art and design employing the media of drawing, painting, sculpture, and printmaking. Students are expected to produce a body of work for evaluation as well as exhibit work in the school and participate in art exhibitions as they occur. There will be ½ credit awarded per semester. Students will be allowed to take the second semester only if they successfully complete the first semester and have prior approval of the teacher. There is a lab fee of $30.00.


Art 2

Prerequisite: Art 1 and/or Instructor Approval
1 Credit
Grades 10-12

Art 2 is a studio course in which students are expected to develop considerable skills in several selected media, and participate in visits to museums, exhibits, and artist studios. Students are expected to produce a body of work for evaluation as well as exhibit work in the school and participate in art exhibitions as they occur. There is a lab fee of $30.00.


Art 3

Prerequisite: Art 2 and/or  Instructor Approval
1 Credit
Grades 10-12

Art 3 is a studio course in which students are expected to continue the exploration of several selected media, and participate in visits to museums, exhibits, and artist studios. Students are expected to produce a body of work for evaluation as well as exhibit work in the school and participate in art exhibitions as they occur. Art 3 also serves to prepare students for AP Art. There is a lab fee of $30.00.


Glass 1

Prerequisite: Art II or Ceramics II, and/or Instructor Approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Glass I is a higher level course designed for students with interest in advanced studio art and AP Studio Art courses that will provide students an opportunity to experiment through hands-on instruction in glass-working, including glass fusing, slumping, stained glass, and more. Students will learn the basic technical skills required for the production of various types and styles of glass art using specialized tools and equipment and will research contemporary and historical glass to inspire their projects. Individual student projects may provide experience in designing, cutting, copper foiling, soldering, etching, lead caning, fusing, and slumping. This class introduces the student to the elements of pattern design concepts, execution in glass selection, cutting, grinding, foiling, soldering, applying patina and polishing glass to construct a finished work, and focuses on safety. Students will also learn the techniques of mosaics and recycling of scrap glass. A strong emphasis is placed on design and originality.


AP 2-D Art and Design

Prerequisite: Instructor approval
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

Students will expand their two-dimensional design and visual communication skills by exploring a variety of design processes and techniques, and compositional and aesthetic concepts. This is an intensive course in which students will address two components in their portfolios: Quality and Concentration, and will submit this body of work to the College Board for grading and possible college credit. Students are expected to use artistic integrity throughout the course. There is a lab fee of $30.00 per semester.


AP 3-D Art and Design

Prerequisite: Instructor approval
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

Through studio practice, application of design concepts, and informed decision making, students will assemble a body of artwork that demonstrates a high level of quality and growth over time, consisting of content, technique, and process. This is an intensive course in which students will pursue the investigation of the three-dimensional form in ceramics and sculpture. As there is no desired or dictated method of approaching the three dimensional forms, it is important that the students express themselves in their own personal style. Critiques with peers and teacher will be an ongoing process and form part of the assessment grade for the course. Students will address two components in their portfolios: Quality and Concentration, and will submit this body of work to the College Board for grading and possible college credit. Students are expected to use artistic integrity throughout the course.  There is a lab fee of $30.00 per semester.


AP Studio Art: Drawing                           

Prerequisite: Instructor approval
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

Students will expand their knowledge of drawing and advance their visual communication skills by exploring a variety of drawing skills, techniques, and compositional and aesthetic concepts. Students will address two components in their portfolios: Quality and Concentration, and will submit this body of work to the College Board for grading and possible college credit. Students are expected to use artistic integrity throughout the course. There is a lab fee of $30.00 per semester.


Band 1

Prerequisite: Audition
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

Band will be offered on a daily basis for students who have two years or more in a top level Middle School ensemble. Students will continue to receive techniques for performing in various sized ensembles, different styles of music, musicianship, and performing all major and minor scales. They will also gain knowledge concerning chords and basic chord progressions to help in learning to improvise music. Class will be offered from 7:30 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Students may take Band for successive years and receive credit for each year. The ensemble will perform at various events throughout the year.


Band 2

Prerequisite: Recommendation upon completion of Band 1 and Instructor approval
1 Credit
Grades 10-12

Band will be offered on a daily basis for students who have one or more years of experience in a high school level ensemble. Students will continue to receive techniques for performing in various sized ensembles, different styles of music, musicianship, and performing all major and minor scales. They will also gain knowledge concerning chords and basic chord progressions to help in learning to improvise music. Second year emphasis will be on development of leadership through their section and audition preparation. Class will be offered from 7:30 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Students may take Band for successive years and receive credit for each year. The ensemble will perform at various events throughout the year.


Band 3

Prerequisite: Recommendation upon completion of Band 1 and Instructor approval
1 Credit
Grades 11-12

Band will be offered on a daily basis for students who have two years of experience in a high school level ensemble. Students will continue to receive techniques for performing in various sized ensembles, different styles of music, musicianship, and performing all major and minor and chromatic scales. They will also gain knowledge concerning chords and basic chord progressions to help in learning to improvise music. Third year emphasis will be on expanding leadership to larger ensembles and aiding section members in the audition process.  Class will be offered from 7:30 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Students may take Band for successive years and receive credit for each year. The ensemble will perform at various events throughout the year.


Band 4

Prerequisite: Recommendation upon completion of Band 1 and Instructor approval
1 Credit
Grade 12

Band will be offered on a daily basis for students who have had three or more years performing in a high school level ensemble. Students will continue to receive techniques for performing in various sized ensembles, different styles of music, musicianship, and performing all scales and modes. They will also perform basic chords and chord progressions as to help in learning to improvise music. Fourth year students will be given opportunities to exhibit their leadership skills to the entire ensemble.  College level audition preparation skills will be taught and assistance will available to those who require it. Class will be offered from 7:30 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Students may take Band for successive years and receive credit for each year. The ensemble will perform at various events throughout the year.


Ceramics 1

Prerequisite: None
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

Ceramics 1 is a one semester basic course for the beginning student that covers step-by-step projects and techniques for manipulating clay, focused on hand building, and using a clay extruder and slab roller. Students will understand form and how it relates to the construction of 3-D pieces of art both functional and non-functional. The basic techniques of manipulating clay and the unique properties of different types of clays will be emphasized. A working knowledge of each of the different types of firings, glazes, and the results will be learned. This course is open to all students. There is a lab fee of $35.00.


Ceramics 2

Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 and/or Instructor Approval
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

Ceramics 2 is a one semester advanced studio class designed to expand the student’s knowledge of clay and concentrate on the design and function of complicated forms. Students will refine their knowledge of concepts and techniques learned in Ceramics 1, and will be introduced to the pottery wheel. The objectives of the course include the advanced knowledge of form and manipulation, and individual development of style. There is a lab fee of $35.00.


Ceramics 3

Prerequisite: Ceramics 2 and/or Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Ceramics 3 is a one semester course for the advanced student. Students will choose a concentration to create a body of work for a final thesis. The objectives of the course include independent study and development of style, and an in-depth exploration of this personal style through a cohesive body of work. There is a lab fee of $35.00.


Ceramics 4

Prerequisite: Ceramics 3 and/or Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Ceramics 4 is a one semester course for the advanced student. The objectives of the course include independent study and development of style, and a highly concentrated in-depth exploration of this personal style through a cohesive body of work. There is a lab fee of $35.00.


Chorus 1

Prerequisite: none (audition required for vocal placement)
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

As members of the Catholic High Chorus, students will gain knowledge in music theory, sight-singing, and choral vocal technique through the performance of both sacred and secular music in different styles and languages. Students will also learn to sing, with and without accompaniment, two, three, and four-part harmonies. There are also opportunities for students to do improvisation and solo work. The Chorus sings at Homecoming, participates in District Chorus auditions, performs Christmas and Spring concerts and are music leaders for weekly Mass and the end-of-year Baccalaureate Service. 

Students may take Chorus for successive years and receive credit for each year. Chorus meets daily at 7:30 am. There is a chorus fee of $80 and an additional concert dress fee for clothing for the final performances.


Chorus 2

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chorus 1 (audition required for vocal placement)
1 Credit
Grades 10-12

As members of the Catholic High Chorus, students will gain knowledge in music theory, sight-singing, and choral vocal technique through the performance of both sacred and secular music in different styles and languages. Students will also learn to sing, with and without accompaniment, two, three, and four-part harmonies. There are also opportunities for students to do improvisation and solo work. The Chorus sings at Homecoming, participates in District Chorus auditions, performs Christmas and Spring concerts and are music leaders for weekly Mass and the end-of-year Baccalaureate Service. 

Students may take Chorus for successive years and receive credit for each year. Chorus meets daily at 7:30 am. There is a chorus fee of $80 and an additional concert dress fee for clothing for the final performances.


Chorus 3

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chorus 2 (audition required for vocal placement)
1 Credit
Grades 11-12

As members of the Catholic High Chorus, students will gain knowledge in music theory, sight-singing, and choral vocal technique through the performance of both sacred and secular music in different styles and languages. Students will also learn to sing, with and without accompaniment, two, three, and four-part harmonies. There are also opportunities for students to do improvisation and solo work. The Chorus sings at Homecoming, participates in District Chorus auditions, performs Christmas and Spring concerts and are music leaders for weekly Mass and the end-of-year Baccalaureate Service. 

Students may take Chorus for successive years and receive credit for each year. Chorus meets daily at 7:30 am. There is a chorus fee of $80 and an additional concert dress fee for clothing for the final performances.


Chorus 4

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chorus 3  (audition required for vocal placement)
1 Credit
Grade 12

As members of the Catholic High Chorus, students will gain knowledge in music theory, sight-singing, and choral vocal technique through the performance of both sacred and secular music in different styles and languages. Students will also learn to sing, with and without accompaniment, two, three, and four-part harmonies. There are also opportunities for students to do improvisation and solo work. The Chorus sings at Homecoming, participates in District Chorus auditions, performs Christmas and Spring concerts and are music leaders for weekly Mass and the end-of-year Baccalaureate Service. 

Students may take Chorus for successive years and receive credit for each year. Chorus meets daily at 7:30 am. There is a chorus fee of $80 and an additional concert dress fee for clothing for the final performances.



TECHNOLOGY

 

Cyber Literacy and Robotics

Prerequisite: None
1 Credit
Grades 9-12

Cyber Literacy and Robotics is a year-long, hands-on course that builds a strong cyber foundation for high school students. The course introduces students to cyber by blending robotics, programming, electricity, and elements of liberal arts. Throughout the course, students learn the basics of electricity, programming, and networking as well as develop critical thinking skills. Cyber Literacy lays a foundation for further exploration into STEM and cyber-related topics.

In the first semester, the students will focus primarily on cybersecurity and electricity. Students will learn about the opportunities, threats, responsibilities, and legal constraints associated with operating in cyberspace. Additionally, they will cover the fundamentals of electricity from the very basic movement of electrons to practical and engaging experiments that include chemistry, circuitry, and magnetism concepts.
In the second semester, the focus of the course will shift to robotics. Students will use a Parallax® Boe-Bot® microcontroller to learn robotics fundamentals. They will be introduced to basic coding essentials through flowcharts and simple programming languages. Students will then assemble their own robots to perform various functions through the implementation of sensors and application of their programming knowledge.
Due to schedule constraints, this course will only be offered during K Bell from 7:30 - 8:13.


AP Computer Science Principles

Prerequisite: Algebra 1
1 Credit Weighted
Grades 10-12

AP Computer Science Principles is a hands-on and exploratory course focusing on problem-solving and real-world applications of computer science. This course is designed to attract a greater diversity of students into the computer science field and, thus, requires no computer science experience and only a basic understanding of Algebra 1. 

The course uses the Edhesive curriculum, designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop computational thinking practices, an understanding of the social implications of computing, and engagement in programming. There is a strong focus on learning through labs and projects where students have opportunities to create programs and other computational artifacts. Students are engaged in small group and whole class discussions, particularly in relation to social implications topics. The curriculum content is designed to foster collaboration and creativity. Throughout the course, students engage in pair programming, and there are ample opportunities for collaboration and creativity in learning the course content.


Computer Graphics 1

Prerequisite: None
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

This one semester course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of computer graphics and design using Adobe CC Illustrator. Students will be able to produce quality artwork and graphic art of the type typically used in commercial applications. The course will be composed of a number of projects designed to teach the elements and principles of design, the software used and proper approach to design problems. There is no lab fee.


Computer Graphics 2

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in the Computer Graphics 1 course and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

This one semester course is designed to utilize graphics skills attained in the Graphics 1 course. Students will continue to explore advanced design software to enhance computer design skills. Since this class will run concurrently with the Computer Graphics 1 class, students must be able to work somewhat independently. The student will construct a thesis proposal to create a product to include branding and advertising of the product. This will be a semester long design project. The finished thesis project will provide a body of work that shows start to finish the work behind the creation of consumer products. There is no lab fee.


Computer Graphics 3

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in the Computer Graphics 2 course and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

The student will be introduced to Adobe InDesign and begin to integrate Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator to design multi-page publications, and advertising campaigns. Student will continue to apply both the elements and principles of design and the design process to create detailed and professional projects that meet the needs of the briefs assigned to them.  Students will become more familiar with the graphic design profession while exploring page layout, typography and color theory.


Graphics Portfolio

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in the Computer Graphics 3 and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

This one semester course is designed to incorporate all the design knowledge acquired in the Graphics courses. Students will improve previous designs using the skills they have learned about the elements and principles of design as well as the Adobe CC suite. Students may not go back and take Graphics 1 or 2 after taking this course. During the semester the student will create a graphic design portfolio that will encompass their entire body of work throughout all Computer Graphics courses taken at CHS. Graphics Portfolio may not be taken simultaneously with any other design course. There is no lab fee.


Photography 1

Prerequisites: None
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

This one semester course is an introduction to basic digital photography. Skills learned in the class will include the operation of a digital camera, learning different settings your camera offers, basic Photoshop manipulation, and print finishing. Emphasis is given to both technique and aesthetic concepts such as composition, design, and lighting. A digital camera with manual settings is preferred. There is no lab fee.


Photography 2

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "B" in Photography 1 and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

In this one semester course students will learn to refine compositional elements, digital manipulation and printing techniques. They will also concentrate on different presentation techniques, matting, and integration of the photo images with the chosen techniques. All students will be encouraged to discover their own individual style of images and subject matter as well as to combine photography with other art media. All students will actively participate in critique sessions of their work and other student’s work. Students will create a digital portfolio to showcase their photography. There is no lab fee.


Photography 3

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B in Photography 2, submission of a portfolio of images, and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

This one semester course is designed to utilize the photography skills attained in the fundamental courses of Photography 1 and 2. Students will continue to explore Adobe Photoshop and Bridge. Students will also be introduced to Adobe Lightroom and begin to integrate this software into their workflow. Students will incorporate advanced photo effects both in camera and in the Adobe Suite. There is no lab fee. 


Photography 4   

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B in Photography 3 and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

This class will require students to work somewhat independently. Students will review past work, research renowned photographers, and explore lighting in depth.  The instructor will construct a thesis proposal with each student. The finished thesis project will provide the student with a body of work that will be submitted as an extensive digital and print photography portfolio. There is no lab fee.


Photojournalism

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
1 credit
Grades 9-12

This photojournalism course has been developed to give students the opportunity to create the school’s annual yearbook publication. Students will apply skills from several concentrations including journalism, photography, and advertising. Students will also gain experience in image editing, page layout, typography, and graphic design. At the end of this course, students will know the building blocks of designing a professional publication.


3D Printing and Design 1

Prerequisite: Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

This course is meant to help students learn the basics of 3D printing. It will cover the of essentials 3D design and the fundamentals of operating a 3D printer.  In 3D Printing and Design, students will be introduced to the world of 3D Printing, an additive manufacturing process and to CAD software where students will manipulate and create designs ready for 3D printing. The engineering design process will be applied to plan their designs. Students will also build prototypes of their designs to ensure their plan is sound before printing a final mock up. During this course, students will explore the many fields that incorporate 3D printing including manufacturing, medicine, fine arts and the fashion industry. The many different materials available for 3D printing, and the benefits and drawbacks of each, will be studied along with the fundamentals of finishing 3D prints. Students will also discuss the potential and limitations of 3D printing. There is a $30 lab fee.


3D Printing and Design 2

Prerequisite Minimum grade of "B" in 3D Printing and Design 1 and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 9-12

In 3D Printing and Design II students will progress to intermediate CAD skills using industry standard software. Students will expand their 3D printing capabilities by scanning, creating original designs and reworking existing CAD files. Students will use various printing techniques, including print in place.  Along with the design process, students will begin to implement the techniques of design thinking to better understand the process of design and manufacturing for the consumer as well as themselves. Intermediate finishing processes will be explored, as well as mold making. There is a $30 lab fee.


3D Printing and Design 3

Prerequisite Minimum grade of "B" in 3D Printing and Design 2 and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

CAD skills will be emphasized in this course, students will begin to combine and build upon their design and CAD skills, creating parametric designs that solve everyday problems. STEAM projects will also be highlighted to encompass the full capacity of 3D printing.  Students will delve under the hood of the 3D printer to understand the inner workings of a printer, including troubleshooting, and G-Code. There is a $30 lab fee.


3D Printing and Design 4

Prerequisite Minimum grade of "B" in 3D Printing and Design 3 and Instructor approval
½ Credit
Grades 10-12

In this final course, students will focus on advancing their CAD skills and building a portfolio. Their portfolio of work should be focused on a particular industry that has strong and or emerging 3D printing potential. Using design thinking and the engineering design process, students will create work that illuminates the direction of their chosen field, and how 3D printing will become an essential part of its growth. There is a $30 lab fee.

Faculty

Kiesha Morrison-Poole

Kiesha Morrison-Poole

Titles: Department Chair, Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Kiesha earned her BA from Berkeley College in New York City and studied Graphic Design at Tidewater Community College. In 2013 she was awarded Teacher Assistant of the Year for VBCPS and was "Tagged by the Superintendent" in 2014. Kiesha believes the arts prepare students to be problem solvers and critical thinkers.

Teresa Browndorf

Teresa Browndorf

Titles: Band/Orchestra Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:
Teresa is a native of Levittown, PA, graduating from Duquesne University with a BSMusEd,and Catholic University of America with a Master of Music degree. She is a retired United States Marine Corps Bandmaster after 20 years active service. Her positions included Instructor at U.S. Navy School of Music at JEB Little Creek and Bandmaster 1st Marine Division Band, where she was the Enlisted Conductor for 2000 Rose Parade West Coast Combined Band.

Teresa has studied with some of the country’s finest musicians, including members of Pittsburgh Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, and Los Angeles Philharmonic. She has performed with the La Jolla Symphony and Tidewater Intergenerational Orchestra and Band.

She most recently held positions as General Music Teacher at Christ the King and Saint John the Apostle Catholic Schools. She has also served as guest instructor with Saint Bede's Children's Orchestra and Philadelphia International Music Festival. In addition to her position at BSCHS, she is an Instrumental Music Teacher at Young Musicians of Virginia and a private studio instructor at Moe’s Music.

Teresa is married to Matthew Browndorf, also of Levittown. Their daughter Megan is presently Eastern European Librarian at Georgetown University.

Warning: She is an avid Phillies Phan!
Leslie Fenter

Leslie Fenter

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Leslie graduated from Northwestern University with a Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance and has recently completed her Master of Music Education at Old Dominion. She has sung with and conducted choirs in Charleston (SC), Saratoga Springs, Salinas, Carmel, and Virginia Beach. At Old Donation Church she teaches music in the Day School as well as leading The Gathering Praise band. In addition to piano, she also enjoys playing cello, banjo, and electric bass.

Margaret Hudson

Margaret Hudson

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:

Margaret has been teaching art for 13 years at Diocesan schools including CHS, Christ the King School in Norfolk, and Portsmouth Catholic Regional School. A native of upstate New York, she received her B.A. with dual majors from Marymount College/Fordham University in Studio Arts and Art Education.

In addition to her teaching career, Mrs. Hudson has been a lifelong advocate for the arts, founding several local businesses dedicated to artistic creativity and education. She is the owner of The Dragonfly Art Studio and Gallery on Colley Avenue in the Ghent area of Norfolk, and also owns and runs Ms. Hudson's Art Camp, a summer art program for children. She founded and organizes the annual Catholic Schools Week Student Art Show, and further promotes the arts within our community as the coordinator of the Neptune Festival Emerging Artist show.

Outside of teaching, Mrs. Hudson enjoys Intaglio printmaking, ceramics, and glass, and spending time with her three children, one who has graduated from CHS, one who is a senior, and another joining CRU family next year.

Michael Walker

Michael Walker

Titles: Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Email:
Biography:
Michael earned a B.S. degree in Mass Communications from Norfolk State University. He has spent more than 30 years working in the Hampton Roads market as a broadcast technician and content provider in the television, radio and print media. He has authored and self-published two books and produces Christian inspired poetry and videos for social media. He is the proud father of two wonderful adult daughters.

He is a 1984 graduate of Norfolk Catholic High School and spent the last 15 years as a pastoral musician for three area churches. He is genuinely excited to be a member of the English faculty as a Journalism instructor and looking forward to reviving the campus newspaper “The Defensor.”

Michael lives by the aphorism as a testament to God guiding his every step in life, “Speak Lord for your servant is listening,” (1 Samuel 3:9).